Daily Prompt: Cosy

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London may be one big city, but it is also made up of lots of smaller towns and villages that over the years been swallowed whole by the inevitable outward expansion of the great metropolis. So here is our cosy little High Street in the town of Leytonstone, East London, taken from the upper front seat of a number 145 double decker bus this afternoon πŸ™‚

Daily Prompt: Cosy

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Sunset Over London

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City sunsets to me are rarely as impressive as those seen in less built-up areas – too much light pollution and less expanse of open space along the skyline to properly appreciate the full effect – so whenever I see even a promising hint of orange glow on the horizon I try to capture it as best as I can.

This was last night’s sunset over London, taken on my way home from work by my camera phone from the footbridge over the A12 in Leytonstone, East London. Not a perfect photograph by any means, but infinitely better than missing the shot altogether.

What surprised me most wasn’t the small number of people like me happy to be capturing the fast-changing colour on their phones on their way past, but the far greater number who walked on by without even lifting their heads to see πŸ™‚

Train Stations by Night

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I’m back from my visit to Scotland to see my family – more of that later – but in the meantime here are some dark and moody night-time shots of near-deserted stations, taken from the window of the overnight train I was travelling in. They’re perhaps a little too unlit and shadowy for some tastes, but the dramatic contrast suited my frame of mind in the wee small hours πŸ™‚

Light Pollution 1: Meteor Shower 0

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Well, at least we tried! Last night with an almost clear sky, my husband and I ventured out to try to see if we could see anything of the Perseid Meteor Shower – the night before had been far too cloudy, but last night seemed to provide far more favourable weather conditions, so we decided to give it a go.

However, having walked to the darkest place close by our home, we soon realised that even in the middle of an open green park space as far away from lights and buildings as possible and with minimal cloud cover, here in London there’s still way too much light pollution around to see much of the night sky with the naked eye, no matter where you are.

We could see the waning moon lying low on the horizon, and a sparse few stars – but only the absolute brightest dotted here and there, and not enough of them to make out any constellation patterns to help get our bearings. And standing together in the ‘dark’ of the city night we understood it was always going to be far too light, and however long we stayed outside we were unlikely to see anything in the way of a meteor shower.

We saw several planes with their winking lights – not that out-of-place as we live under a flight path – and a surprise firework or two in the distance, and one late-night dog-walker in a high-vis vest, but nothing else of any note during the hour or so we were outside. The air was beautifully still and calm, refreshing and energising, and it was fun to be trying something different, even though we were sadly unsuccessful in our quest.

So after a while we just called it a day and gave up – but at least we tried!

PS I took a few street shots, just because everything looks different at night – empty, silent, still. And lit up like a Christmas tree…Β  πŸ™‚