A-Z Challenge: U is for Underground

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U is for Underground…

Confusingly the platforms of Leytonstone Underground Station (and the railway line itself at this point – see T is for Tube Line from yesterday) are actually above ground! When you enter the station from street level, you have to walk down a curved slope into the below-the-surface ticket office, before going through the automated ticket barriers and climbing the central stairs back up to reach the ground level platforms between the tracks.

This year for my Blogging from A-Z Challenge I’ve decided to keep it super-simple, and stick close to home with a straightforward agenda. I tend to post lots of local London images anyway, so my aim is to post at least one new (as in taken recently, and not posted before) photograph each day, taking us on a whistle-stop A-Z tour of Local Leytonstone Life; simple snapshot images of ordinary everyday things around me that capture my attention, yet don’t take me out of my daily routine too much…

A-Z Challenge: T is for Tube Line

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T is for Tube Line…

Leytonstone is located on the Central Line, which snakes all the way horizontally across London from Epping in the East, through Central London, and on to West Ruislip in the West. At 46 miles from one end to the other it is the longest tube line, and it certainly feels like one of the busiest, especially during rush hour!  Although the middle section of the Central Line is a deep level underground line, at either end it sits on the surface, including here in Leytonstone 🙂

This year for my Blogging from A-Z Challenge I’ve decided to keep it super-simple, and stick close to home with a straightforward agenda. I tend to post lots of local London images anyway, so my aim is to post at least one new (as in taken recently, and not posted before) photograph each day, taking us on a whistle-stop A-Z tour of Local Leytonstone Life; simple snapshot images of ordinary everyday things around me that capture my attention, yet don’t take me out of my daily routine too much…

A-Z Challenge: O is for Overground

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O is for Overground…

As well as Leytonstone Underground Station, we also have Leytonstone High Road Station which is part of the Transport for London (TfL) Overground railway line.

PS This is the overground railway line that has given us the many railway arches referred to in A is for Arches 🙂

This year for my Blogging from A-Z Challenge I’ve decided to keep it super-simple, and stick close to home with a straightforward agenda. I tend to post lots of local London images anyway, so my aim is to post at least one new (as in taken recently, and not posted before) photograph each day, taking us on a whistle-stop A-Z tour of Local Leytonstone Life; simple snapshot images of ordinary everyday things around me that capture my attention, yet don’t take me out of my daily routine too much…

Caledonian Sleeper

I’m just back from a lovely visit with my family in Scotland, travelling home overnight on the Caledonian Sleeper. Not particularly exciting, as it’s a trip I’ve been doing regularly for the last 15 years, for as long as I’ve lived in London. In an age where everyone expects me to fly – the actual in-the-air flight time between London and Inverness is only around an hour and 20 minutes – I find I still prefer to take the train.

The trouble with flying is (1) I first have to travel either to Heathrow, Luton or Gatwick to catch a plane from London to Inverness – so that’s an additional train or coach journey, incurring extra cost and adding a lot of extra time and hassle to the journey; (2) going through airport security takes forever, and there’s a lot of additional hanging around in departures until the flight is called; and (3) I then need to find transport at the other end, from Inverness airport into the city – that’s either relying on the (generally unreliable) rural public transport system, or a very expensive taxi-ride the 10 miles or so into town.

The last time I flew up, time was of the essence on that occasion because my youngest daughter had called me in the morning to say she was in the early stages of labour (her third baby, almost two weeks before her due date) so could I please get up there as soon as possible – which I did, as needs must, and thankfully all went well.

But otherwise I can either take the daytime train and sit for 8 hours whiling away the day, or take the more leisurely overnight train, which may take longer time-wise but in reality doesnt actually waste any time at all as you basically go to sleep at one end of the country and wake up at the other, refreshed and rejuvenated and raring to go (or someting like that).

Sadly the old rolling stock is a little bit outdated now, and is due to be replaced over the next couple of years. So the Orient Express it is not, but I took a few pics anyway to give a flavour of the experience… 🙂

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On the platform at Inverness last night…

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Very compact little cabins with bunk beds for two, accessed via a long narrow corridor…

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Comfortable enough bunk beds, if rather restricted in size…

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Little sink under the window, used for additional storage when not in use…

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Arriving at London Euston early this morning 🙂

Daily Prompt: Giant

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I suppose it stands to reason that when faced with the question of what to put into the belly of a cavernous Victorian Gothic railway terminus building (other than trains, of course), the answer is to complement the curves of the giant wrought iron ribs with a pair of giant clocks suspended from the ceiling, and a giant (9m high) statue of an embracing couple saying their fond farewells…

London St Pancras Station was originally opened in 1868. At that time it housed the largest single spanned roof ever built and its design was copied across the world, including in New York’s Grand Central Station 🙂

Daily Prompt: Giant